Frequently Asked Questions

Don’t leave your special event to chance. We work tirelessly to ensure a stellar reputation. Here’s what our clients have to say:


Testimonials 

1-13-14
Hi Carolyn!
I was so pleased!
Everything was so perfect.
It was all totally amazing and set the tone of the day perfectly…..
Thanks
Rita


1-22-14
Thank you and your husband for going out of your way to make my friends 50th birthday a very happy one. She sent everyone a picture of it and lived it especially since she didn’t let anyone at work know it was her birthday. She could not hide it with that beautiful bouquet. Showed everyone your website. Thank you once again. Diana N.

Thank you so much for the wonderful balloons! They look so beautiful and really brought a great dimension to each of the event sites and the balloon columns were super cool and made a fantastic entryway at Dave & Busters. We are so grateful that you would deliver to each site; it totally made my life easier and more colorful!


Dear Carolyn:

A very belated thank you for all your help with the 50th Wedding Anniversary
Party we threw for my in-laws on August 29th. The balloons truly made the
event! Many thanks to you, and to your husband and son, too — Have attached a
couple of pictures so you can see how nice your balloons made everything.
Ann H. Santa Monica, CA


On behalf of the entire group that attended the ACSA dinner at the Hilton Wednesday evening, I thank you for your shooting star balloon display. It was a tremendous hit and made the evening that much more special.
Principle Jeff Kilty


Just wanted to tell you how delighted our admin staff and our boss were with the balloon bouquet we gave her for Boss’ Day 2009. Amazingly, it’s still beautiful. A few of the smaller balloons lost their air, but the main structure is still completely intact! Our boss still has it in her office and vows to keep it there as long as it stays inflated. What a wonderful display! L Hoover


Earlier today, I had a balloon bouquet sent to my sister. I must say, from the beginning of my order to the thank you I received from my sister, your service was AWESOME to say the least. She works for a huge company, and many of them took your information, as they were impressed as well. Your service will be used for my 25th anniversary. THANK YOU for awesome customer service on such a short notice. D. Austin


By the way those balloons turned out amazing! I could not get over how
perfect the balloons made the whole set up of my open house theme just
come together. The colors were perfect, size was perfect, everything
was great! Thank you so much for making that come together! I will be
referring you to anyone that needs balloons done in the future and
personally will go through you if the opportunity comes that I need
balloons made Krystle J.


YOU ALL ARE AWESOME!!! My co-worker, Deborah, just got the balloon bouquet with the x-tras and it is PERFECT! I LOVE the purple bouquet – it is so much better than I imagined it would be!!!
THANKS SO MUCH – again – you all are AWESOME! Twila


The balloons were a hit! Not only were they beautiful, but they
worked well to set our conference apart from the other gatherings at the hotel. After using them at the Thursday evening reception, we put them in front of the doors at the Hyatt for the President’s Luncheon on Friday and then decorated the patio for the Saturday evening reception. Everyone loved them! Thank you so much for the wonderful job! Thanks again for being so creative! Diane V.


“Thank you for providing the balloons for Good Day Sacramento Volunteer-a-thon. We have used other balloon providers in the past and have been disappointed. Your creations made the background look so vibrant and exciting. You came up with an excellent design and delivered them on time. It was a pleasure to work with you both. We got a lot of great feed back from those in studio and viewers who just loved your creations……” Chris Burrous


Well, our Golf Expo is over and it was a huge success. The balloon arch was wonderful, a great focal point for the customer and our vendors. I appreciate Michael being on time each day and all your advice about which balloons would work best for our event. I will call you again if we have any other need for a balloon creation.
Thank you, Marlene Kawaguchi


Carolyn,

Thank you so much for providing such spectacular balloons, and on such short notice! I thought you might want to see how they looked on our float. As soon as we arrived at the parade staging area we were approached by the Good Day Sacramento crew who wanted to interview our drivers. We, along with our sponsor, Callen Pool Supply of Rancho Cordova, won the “First Place Commercial” float award. Thanks to Balloons by Carolyn! L. Hoover


I just wanted to say to you and your team, thank you for the wonderful balloon bouquets that you brought to us out at Denby, they really made it feel alive.

It is always a pleasure working with you Ronee Briley


I just wanted to say how pleased we were with your balloon creations at my daughters wedding! It was amazing! Many people were asking who did them. Thank you so much for making it beautiful and the party atmosphere my daughter and new son-in-law were trying to capture!

From a happy Mother of the Bride
L. Steele


Dear Hadin Family,

I just wanted to say thank you so much for the beautiful balloon decorations for my daughter’s first birthday. It looked absolutely amazing. I was really worried after seeing how low the ceilings were in the church hall, but you guys completely pulled it off. We received non-stop compliments and people said they had never seen anything like it before. You guys had the balloons up within minutes and it just looked beautiful. I can’t thank you enough. We will definately be contacting you again next time we have an event.

Thank you!! K. Fa’avae


Thanks so much for the great service and the wonderful products that you produce. As always it is a pleasure dealing with you. Bob Olson


Thank you for your outstanding service and the beautiful balloon bouquets for KVIE’s Leadership Donor Luncheon. The event was a great success, thanks in part to you and your services. I look forward to our next event where we can partner again. M. R.


Thank you for your outstanding service and the beautiful balloon bouquets for KVIE’s Leadership Donor Luncheon. The event was a great success, thanks in part to you and your services. I look forward to our next event where we can partner again. Jane B.


Thank you big time. The balloons were wonderful. Your delivery person dropped them off a little early so they were already set up when I arrived at the venue. As much as I wanted to take credit for them when guests asked, I came clean and let them know who delivered. Michael Feance


I recently ordered a large boquet of balloons for my sisters birthday. It was for her 99th birthday, and she was very pleased with the attractive boquet you delivered. She has rather poor eyesight and cannot see flowers very well. The boquet you delivered to her nursing home in Sacramento was really enjoyed by her as well as other members of our family. Many of the other patients who reside at the Pioneer House thought it was an exciting gift and their day was brightened also by your arrangement.Thank you for your good work and prompt delivery Stu Allen


Thank you Carolyn! I meant to email you the second I got home to tell you what a HIT the balloons were!!!!

First of all, I couldn’t believe that all of those balloons came out of those two kind of not so huge trucks! They were a wonder to behold once they were in the gym. I LOVE the towers. Good call on everything! Barbara Jo Tricks Gym


Dear Carolyn and Mike, I can’t tell you how pleased we were with the balloon decoration you created for the Intel meeting. We received so many kudo’s for your beautiful array. I will definately keep you in my rolodex and spread the good news with my many peers. Cynthia


Hi Carolyn,

I heard that you blew everyone away with your decorative display….. Thanks so much for your efforts with such short notice. You helped make a lot of people very, very happy.

I hope we have another excuse to use your services in the near future. C. Sanders


Thank you for doing such a wonderful job on our decorations – they made a huge deference in the room! You were a huge part of our dream day! Emmaunuel and Jennifer Obioha


Dear Carolyn, I just had to send a thank you note. The party you helped Julie with was the most amazing party in the world! I was beside myself the whole night. Your balloons were so over the top awesome, I just couldn’t believe them. We took them to the office the next day because they were so cool……. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking care of Julie and making my party something I’ll never forget the rest of my life. You pulled it off in record time. It was AMAZING! Thank you Thank you Thank you. Truly…. thank you. L. Bedlak


I just wanted to let you know how beautiful the balloons were that you delivered for our party last Saturday. We really appreciated your effort to get the centerpiece and other balloons to the restaurant on time and get everything arranged. Everyone from the staff to other diners commented on the fantastic balloon arrangement- it truly exceeded our expectations. I recommended your company to all of them. Thank you so much!
4/10/07 Wendy Chambers


“Thank you for providing the balloons for Good Day Sacramento Volunteer-a-thon. We have used other balloon providers in the past and have been disappointed. Your creations made the background look so vibrant and exciting. You came up with an excellent design and delivered them on time. It was a pleasure to work with you both. We got a lot of great feed back from those in studio and viewers who just loved your creations……”


A few weeks ago I ordered some balloons for a dear friend in the hospital. These balloons have been a topic of conversation, enjoyment and cheer since they arrived at the hospital. When he was moved to Roseville, they transported the balloon man in the same ambulance as him. Another good story. I just want to thank you for the smiles and good cheer your balloons brought to my dearest friends. Everything helps to bring about a good result and your balloons did helped bridge the 3000 miles between us. Peter


Thank you so much for the beautiful balloon ice cream sundae sculptures for my party. They were absolutely beautiful and had many compliments. The people at the pavilion also would like to put you down on their vendor list that they give to their clients. Laura Y.

 

FAQ

1. What is Helium?

Helium is environmentally safe, non-toxic and non flammable. Helium should not be inhaled, as it displaces the oxygen in your lungs, causing serious lung injuries. Do not inhale helium from a balloon or a helium tank under any circumstances.

Helium — The Sun Gas
The Helium Market
Early Helium Recovery Efforts
Helium from theBureau of Land Management System

Helium Fact Sheet

  • Helium is a limited, natural resource
  • On Earth it is created by the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium.
  • In our atmosphere, the amount of helium by volume is only 5.2 ppm (vs Argon at .93%)
  • Natural gas can contain helium under certain geological conditions.
  • The amounts range from trace levels to about 5% BY VOLUME.
  • The Helium Act of 1925, authorized the US Bureau of Mines to build and operate a loarge-scale helium extraction and purification plant. It paid dividends quickly as it provided the US and its World War II allies a critical supply of helium.
  • By the mid 1950’s, as natural gas demand increased, some helium rich sources began to dwindle. At this time, US Natural gas demand increased so dramatically much o the nation’s potential helium reserves were being vented to the air.
  • With the Helium Act Amendments of 1960 came the privatization of helium. the US congress then provided incentives to natural gas producers to strip helium from natural gas and sell it to the United States for long term strategic storage.
  • Without the foresight of the US Congress and The 1960 Act, US industry might have had to rely on foreign sourced supplies of helium with the possibility of more frequent supply interruptions, plus the potential of foreign price cartels and geopolitical supply situations similar to what we experience with the supply of oil today.
  • The helium Privatization Act of 1996 was signed by President Clinton on October 9, 1996.This law directed the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to cease pure helium production and to offer for sale the approximately 29+Billion Cubic Feet (BCF) of crude helium (CHe) in the Federal Reserve.
  • The Federal Reserve fields contained about 25.5 BCF at the end of fiscal year 2005.
  • The United States represents 21% of the worlds known helium reserve. It produces 77% percent of the world’s annual consumption.
  • Helium produced in Algeria, Poland and Russia is sold almost exclusively into European markets, and helium produced in Qatar is sold exclusively into Asian markets. these countries combined own 79% of the worldwide helium reserves yet produced only 23%.
  • According to the US Department of Commerce, US domestic consumption of helium declined between 2000 and 2005 at an average of 2.3% per year.
  • Exports however, increased at an average rate of 7.5% per year over the same five year period, reflecting demand increases in emerging economies where helium is not produced.
  • In 2005, US consumption decreased 4.7 percent, but exports increased by 16.9%.

2. How long will my balloons float?

It depends on the size of the balloon. The larger the balloon, the more helium used, therefore the longer the balloon will last. Generally foil balloons last longer than latex balloons. We also use a flight extender treatment which allows the balloons to last 5 times longer then without treatment. Also, most of our sculptures are nitrogen filled and the balloons last up to one month or longer, depending on the enviroment.

3. Are latex balloons bio-degradable?
Yes! Latex balloons are made from bio-degradable rubber tree sap and are environmentally safe. Latex balloons bio-degrade at the same rate as an oak leaf.

Latex balloons are made from 100% natural latex — not plastic. Our latex balloons are biodegradable, and decompose as fast as an oak leaf in your backyard!

The natural rubber latex that is used to make latex balloons comes from the rubber tree , Hevea Brasiliensis, that grows in Malaysia, Asia and Africa. Contrary to popular belief, latex is not the trees sap which is the vital liquid needed for growth. Tiny vessels under the rubber trees bark are the source of the worlds rubber supply.

Latex is collected by “tapping” the trees. The tree trunk is scored (cut with a knife)halfway across its width. The score is made about a millimeter deep and slanted downward at a 30 degree angle and is repeated every second or third day with each cut made directly below the previous one.

Scoring the bark opens the tubes, and the cut “weeps” or oozes latex for about two hours. A small spout inserted into the bark directs the liquid into a collect cup. Once removed from the tree, the liquid is called latex. This latex looks like milk and is shipped to America in large ocean tanker ships.

Latex balloons are Earth-friendly! Rubber trees grow in rain forests. Latex harvesting discourages deforestation because latex-producing trees are left intact. A tree can produce latex for up to 35 years!

Balloons were invented in 1824, the same year as the electromagnet.
Pioneer manufactures nearly one billion Qualatex latex balloons per year.

Balloon Creations By Carolyn always hand ties all our balloons. We do not us plastic ties or disks.

I put together a presentation for LeTip. This is from my research. I came up with a conservative average size and number of balloons we use per year in our business. That average is 400,000 11″ latex balloon. Each Hevea Brasiliensis tree, better know as the “Rubber Tree”, only produces enough sap (latex) to make two 11″ latex balloons per day! 400,000 balloons divided by 2 (latex harvested per day per tree) is 200,000. Divide that by 365 days per year is 548. So for just us, Balloon Creations By Carolyn, in Sacramento California, 548 trees somewhere in Asia or Africa work every day of the year to support just our business alone!

The rubber tree starts producing latex when they are seven years old, and give latex until they are around thirty five years old. That is twenty eight years of work for our trees. Our trees and us, are now in our 19th year of business, and we hope with your support, in 9 years when our trees retire, we can too!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aztMri15R7A (Fast forward till you see rubber trees)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KekZKxroPss&feature=related

There are lots of youtube videos online.

ALSO- The more balloons (latex products), the more rubber trees. And with the destruction of forests a prime environmental concern, that is an important point. Besides giving us latex, the rubber trees remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air, counteracting global warming.

ALSO- Latex products are recycled and can be transformed into all kinds of rubber items: windshield wipers, car bumpers, sports equipment, and more.

4. Should we try to do the balloons ourselves?
Surely, it would be cheaper. Unless the balloons are Professionally treated with a flight extending product, they will only float for approximately 8 – 10 hours. Because of this fact balloon decor is typically created on the wedding day. Without inflation experience, it will take the average person approximately 2 hours to inflate 100 balloons. Also, most balloon wedding decorators offer excellent prices on pre-inflated bulk balloons, so that by the time you buy the uninflated balloons, rent the helium tank and inflator, and buy ribbon, the difference in price is so small as to be insignificant compared to the inconvenience caused by trying to do the balloons yourselves.

5. What is a CBA?
A Certified Balloon Artist through the Qualatex Balloon Network, have undergone extensive training in the application of key design elements in balloon decor. This is the most comprehensive certification program in the professional balloon industry to ensure all participating members are knowledgeable and dedicated professionals.

6. How do I choose a balloon company that’s right for our wedding?
Some Professional balloon decorators actually specialize in wedding decor. The True Professionals, who specialize in wedding work, exhibit at the premium bridal shows, during the beginning of each year. This offers you an excellent opportunity to compare the work in their portfolios, and enjoy incentives and packages they offer during the show. You might also ask the reception site coordinator for recommendations. Most hotels and halls have worked with several companies and know the true professionals.

When you meet the balloon artist that is right for you, you will feel it. That person should be professional and make you feel comfortable and confident in their artistic and professional ability. They will take time to listen to you and they will offer suggestions that will achieve the look and effect that you want, not just what they want to sell you.

Some questions for you to ask are:
- Do they have recent references?
- May you speak with one of their references?
- Do they have insurance? Ask for proof.
- Have they ever decorated your site? Do they have pictures of your site decorated?
- Do they offer wedding packages?
- Are they willing to do small, intimate decor, or only large extravagant decor?
- Is delivery and set up included?
- Would it be possible for you to visit a site in the near future to observe their work?
- Are they a Qualatex CBA (Certified Balloon Artist)?

7. Why should I be careful with Metallic balloons outside?
Helium filled balloons can be dangerous if they become tangled in power lines. Loose balloons, especially metallic/foil/mylar balloons, can cause power outages and may cause wires to fall to the ground resulting in property damage, fire, and even injury or death. Avoid potential balloon hazards by following these tips.

NEVER let helium balloons drift away outdoors.

NEVER try to retrieve balloons caught in a power line. And NEVER go near a downed power line or dangling wire.

8. What happens when a balloon pops?
If the sound of a balloon popping startles you, you’re not alone. A bursting balloon actually creates a small sonic boom! Once a hole is made in an inflated balloon, the quick release of the balloons energy, or air, causes the hole to grow at almost the speed of sound in rubber. Since this speed is much higher than the speed of sound in air, the hole in the balloon actually breaks the sound barrier, creating a sonic boom.

9. How many balloons does Balloon Creations By Carolyn use per year?
I put together a presentation for LeTip. This is from my research. I came up with a conservative average size and number of balloons we use per year in our business. That average is 400,000 11″ latex balloon. Each Hevea Brasiliensis tree, better know as the “Rubber Tree”, only produces enough sap (latex) to make two 11″ latex balloons per day! 400,000 balloons divided by 2 (latex harvested per day per tree) is 200,000. Divide that by 365 days per year is 548. So for just us, Balloon Creations By Carolyn, in Sacramento California, 548 trees somewhere in Asia or Africa work every day of the year to support just our business alone!

The rubber tree starts producing latex when they are seven years old, and give latex until they are around thirty five years old. That is twenty eight years of work for our trees. Our trees and us, are now in our 19th year of business, and we hope with your support, in 9 years when our trees retire, we can too!

10. What is the Qualatex Balloon Network about?
The Qualatex Balloon Network (QBN) unites and supports businesses that offer value-added balloon designs featuring Qualatex products.

QBN Business Members are dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in balloon decor and bouquets.

They’re committed to sound and honorable business practices, continuing education, and the belief that balloons create atmosphere and communicate emotion in a uniquely effective way.

They believe that the high quality of the products they sell and the professionalism in the services they offer, provide superior value to their customers and form the foundation for the future success of businesses featuring value-added balloon designs.

11. What is a Certified Balloon Artist (CBA)?
A CBA is a balloon professional who has:
* Taken and passed (with a score of 80% or above) all of the QBN tests
* Taken and passed (with a score of 80% or above) the CBA Practical Exam – a timed, 4-hour, hands-on exam designed to confirm knowledge of the QBN curriculum.

Professionals who earn the CBA designation have chosen to grow their businesses through networking with other balloon professionals, continuing their education, giving and receiving referrals, and taking advantage of the marketing support available to CBAs.

There are currently more than 2,000 Certified Balloon Artist professionals worldwide.

12. Where were balloons invented?
Balloons—in one form or another—have been around for centuries. But the modern latex balloon—the kind you can blow up yourself—was invented in New England during the Great Depression.

A chemical engineer, frustrated in his attempts to make inner tubes from this new product—liquid latex—scrawled a cat’s head on a piece of cardboard and dipped it in the latex. When it dried, Neil Tillotson had a “cat balloon,” complete with ears. He made about 2,000 balloons and sold them on the street during Boston’s annual Patriot Day parade.

In the late 1970s, silver metalized balloons were developed for the New York City Ballet. These balloons are commonly called Mylar, but they are actually made from a metalized nylon and are more expensive than latex balloons.

13. What happens to balloons that fly away?
Often latex balloons are released either on purpose or accidentally. Research shows that most of these latex balloons—the ones that are well-tied and have no structural flaws—rise to an altitude of about five miles, where they freeze, breaking into spaghetti-like pieces that scatter as they return to earth. While we do know that animals occasionally eat these soft slivers of rubber, the evidence indicates that pieces ultimately pass through the digestive system without harming the animal.

14. Do Balloons Create Litter?

Mass balloon releases come under fire from misinformed critics who inaccurately claim releases generate a major source of litter and threaten the ecology. While anecdotal, subjective “evidence” is usually cited to support these assertions, corroborating factual data is rarely presented.

Important facts you should know about latex balloon releases:

  1. Only latex balloons are used by professionals in mass releases. Industry guidelines require these balloons to be self-tied and have no attached strings or ribbons — each released balloon is 100 percent biodegradable.
  2. Rarely do released balloons return to the earth’s surface intact. Studies show these balloons usually rise to an altitude of about five miles. At that point, freezing and air pressure causes “brittle fracture” creating spaghetti-like pieces that scatter to the four winds.
  3. While some balloons don’t reach this altitude, research indicates that in an average 500-balloon release, the unexploded balloon return density is no greater than one per 15 square miles.
  4. Research shows that regardless of the latex balloon’s ultimate form when it lands, it will decompose, forming a natural soil nutrient at the same rate as that of an oak leaf.

Latex Allergies

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/facts.html#latex

Avoiding Choking Accidents

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/facts.html#choking

Balloon Litter

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/facts.html#litter

Balloon Releases

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/facts.html#releases

Where Do Balloons Go When They Fall On The Ground

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/html/sciexp1.html

Learning About Permiability

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/html/sciexp2.html

Measuring How Fast Helium Filled Balloons Rise

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/html/sciexp3.html

Which Way Is The Wind Blowing

http://www.balloonhq.com/BalloonCouncil/html/sciexp4.html

Some of the answers above were provided from The Balloon Council. Please visit this site for more information: http://www.balloonhq.com

Fun Balloon Facts

  • If the sound of a balloon popping startles you, you’re not alone. A bursting balloon actually creates a small sonic boom! Once a hole is made in an inflated balloon, the quick release of the balloon’s energy, or air, causes the hole to grow at almost the speed of sound in rubber. Since this speed is much higher than the speed of sound in air, the hole in the balloon actually breaks the sound barrier, creating a sonic boom.
  • Balloons were invented in 1824, the same year as the electromagnet.
  • Pioneer manufactures nearly one billion Qualatex latex balloons per year.
  • Helium-filled balloons float because helium is lighter than nitrogen and oxygen, the two components of air.
  • For more than 80 years, Qualatex balloons have celebrated big events worldwide — from American political conventions to Korean television specials.

Much Much Much More Information About Balloons

BALLOON PARTY GAMES

Twister

Break out a game of Twister and toss out the spinner for this game.1. Write “left foot” “right foot” “left hand” and “right hand” on pieces of paper and put one inside each red, blue, yellow and green balloon. 2. Inflate the balloons and attach ribbons. If playing outdoors, also attach weights. 3. The person who would be the spinner is now the popper. Pop a balloon to call out the next move. For example, if the popper busts a red balloon containing a piece of paper that says “right foot,” the move is “right hand on red.” The popper can choose the color, but not the foot/hand.

Similar to drawing straws, this is a quick game for very young children or a way to decide who goes first in a game for older children.

1. Fill balloons with helium and attach different lengths of ribbons to each balloon.

2. Gather all the balloons together and bunch the ribbons in your hand.

3. Each child picks a balloon, and the one who picks the balloon with the longest ribbon wins a prize or goes first in the next game.

Helium Reverse Volleyball

All it takes to play this game is a long ribbon, rope or a net, a helium-filled balloon and two teams of agile players.

1. Tie the ribbon between two stationary objects so that the ribbon is about waist-high to the players. 2. Divide the teams evenly on either side of the ribbon. 3. The helium-balloon must be batted under the ”net” rather than over it as in regular volleyball. 4. A point is scored when the balloon hits the ceiling on the opposing team?s side.

Attach a ribbon to the balloon in order to easily retrieve it after a point is scored.

Ready, Aim, Fire!

Balloon Time recommends reserving this game for an outdoor party.

1. Mark a horizontal line on the ground. 2. Secure the end of a 3′ ribbon tied to a helium-filled balloon to the ground about 2 – 1/2′ in front of the line. Do the same on the other side of the line. 3. Divide the children into two teams, and arm them with water guns. 4. At the signal, all the children begin firing at the balloon, and the first team to push its balloon over the line wins.

This game can be modified by using cans of silly string instead of water guns.

Whistle Race

1. Place one plastic whistle inside each color of balloon before inflating.

2. Fill an equal number of different colors of balloons with helium and attach weights with ribbon.

3. Divide the party guests into the same number of teams as the number of different colored balloons.

4. At the signal, the children look for the whistle in their team?s balloon color by sitting or stomping on them.

The team that is first to find and blow its whistle wins.

Sink the Balloon

1. Inflate balloons and attach ribbons and weights so the balloons will not float away.

2. Give each player a can of silly string.

The object of the game is to cover the balloon with silly string until it sinks to the ground. The silly string comes out fast, so it knocks the balloon around and makes a challenging game. The player or team that sinks their balloon first is the winner.

Crazy Caterpillar Catastrophe

1. Players?split up into teams of 3 to 6.

2. Each person puts hands on hips of person in front of them, and the last person has a balloon attached to the backside of their belt.

The objective of this game is to try to pop the other team’s balloon, but the only person who can use their hands is the first person in the caterpillar because the others have to keep their hands on the hips of the person in front of them.

Backwards Basketball

1. Put two hoops on opposite sides of the room.

2. Play with a helium balloon?so the players?have to dribble the balloon to keep it down on the ground.

3. If they dribble poorly and the balloon floats to the ceiling, the other team gets the balloon.

The object of the game is to push or shoot the helium balloon under the hoop so it floats through the underside of the hoop.

Attach a ribbon to the balloon in order to easily retrieve it when it floats to the ceiling.

Don’t Burst My Bubble!

1. Inflate helium balloons, attach white ribbons and evenly distribute them to the players.

2. Each player writes his/her name on all of his/her balloon(s).

3. Collect all the balloons and mix them up into one, large bunch and hold them tightly in your hand.

4. Each player gets a turn to pick a balloon by choosing the end of the ribbon that isn?t tied to the balloon.

5. The player then pops the balloon they have chosen.

The player whose balloon survives until the end is the winner!

Balloon Round-Up

1. Divide the players into even teams.
2. Assign a balloon color to each team.

3. Inflate the same number of balloons for each team and attach a ribbon to each one.

4. Tie something just heavy enough to keep the balloons from floating away to the other end of each of the ribbons. (Try paper clips!)

5. Mark off a ?pen? area for each team.

6. Tie the players? hands behind their backs.

7. At the signal, the players have to round up their team?s balloons and get them into their ?pen? by bumping them with their head or feet or blowing on them.

The first team to round up all its balloons wins!

If you don?t have enough balloons to give each team its own color, just use whatever colors you have and mark each team?s balloons with a marker. Just make sure that each team has the same number of balloons to round up.

Balloon Minefield

1. Designate an area of the yard to be the ?minefield?.
2. Divide the players into teams of 2.

3. Write each team?s name on 3 flags. (Tape a piece of paper to the end of a straw or stick to make a flag.)

4. Inflate helium balloons and attach ribbon and a weight.

5. Scatter the balloons and stick the flags into the ground throughout the minefield.

6. Each team then chooses a guide. The guide will stand at the far end of the balloon minefield and guide their blindfolded team member to their flags.

7. If the blindfolded team member touches a balloon along the way, he/she has to stick all the flags he/she has collected at that point back into the ground, go back to the other side of the minefield and start over.

The team whose flag-collector is first to collect all 3 of its flags and make it across the minefield to their guide is the winner!

Ring Toss

1. Attach weights to varying lengths of ribbon tied to helium-filled balloons to hold them in place.

2. Scatter the balloons throughout the playing area.

3. Determine the “tossing point” and have the party guests take turns trying to toss rings over the balloons.

Depending on how big the balloons are inflated, you can use quilting hoops, stiff play necklaces, hula hoops, or other items from around the house as rings. Use foam balls to hit the balloons if you don’t have anything to use for hoops.

To make the game more interesting, you can assign different point values to different size or color balloons.

Hot Potato

1. Have the players sit in a circle, and give one player an inflated helium balloon with a ribbon attached.

2. When you play music, the players have to pass the balloon to the player on their right.

3. When the music is stopped, the player holding the balloon is out.

Children will not be able to toss the “potato” and will have to pass it with both hands to keep it from floating away. If the balloon gets away from them, they will have to use the ribbon to quickly pull the balloon down in order to hand it to the next person.

Make it a rule that they must pass the balloon, not the ribbon. The level of difficulty can be modified for younger or older children. The more the balloon is inflated, the harder it will be to hold onto.

Duck, Duck, Goose

1. The children sit in a circle as in Duck, Duck, Goose.

2. Each child has a helium-filled balloon tied in a loose bow onto a belt loop or a strap of clothing.

3. The child who is “It” walks around the outside of the circle tapping the balloons and saying “duck.”

4. When he/she picks the “goose,” he/she smacks his/her balloon while yelling “Goose!” and takes off running around the circle.

5. The “goose” then jumps up and has to snatch the balloon from the child who tagged him/her.

If the “goose” gets the balloon, the child who was “It” is out. If the “goose” doesn?t get the balloon before the other child sits in his/her spot, then s/he is “It” in the next round.

Leap Frog Relay

1. Divide the players into teams, and give each player a helium-filled balloon with a ribbon and weight attached.

2. Start with an extra balloon in place for each team.

3. When someone yells “Go!” the first player, with balloon in hand, jumps over the first balloon, places his/her balloon on the ground, and then returns to the line and tags the next player.

4. Continue until one team has placed all its balloons in a line. The first team to do so is the winner.

Another version is to give the players balloons and have them jump over each other, as in traditional Leap Frog, but when they get to the end of the leaping line, they have to sit on and pop their balloons. A winner is declared when one team has all its players in the leaping line and its last balloon is popped.

To make for a more challenging game, make the ribbons extra long. If playing indoors, remove the weights. If the balloon gets away from a player while trying to pop it, he/she will have to reel it in by the ribbon.

Scavenger Hunt

To make the hunt a little more exciting for the party guests, you can designate the scavenger items or provide clues for finding them on pieces of paper placed inside the balloons before filling them with helium. To use helium balloons outside, tie weights to ribbons and attach them to the balloons. The children will have to pop the balloons to figure out what to look for or to find the clue.

If the scavenger hunt items are small and light, they themselves can be placed inside the balloons.

Balloon Tag

  1. Tie inflated balloons to the wrist or belt loop of all but one player with ribbon.2. The player without a balloon is “It”.3. When that player tags another player, he/she gets the player’s balloon and that player becomes “It”.
  2. Ultimate Balloon Ball

1. Place 5 inflated balloons with long ribbons tied to weights behind?each player.
2. The players will throw foam balls at the other players’ balloons.

3. When hit, that balloon is out, but the players can block shots?against their balloons.

Capture the Balloon

1. Separate the players into 2 even teams and assign a color to each team.

2. Give an inflated balloon of the assigned color to each player.

3. Decide how long the game will last.

4. Randomly choose a team to be “It” first.

5. At the signal, players from the ?It? team try to tag the players on the other team.

6. When a player is tagged, he/she has to give his/her balloon to player that tagged him/her and give that player a 3-second head-start to run.

7. Players without a balloon, including any players who accidentally let go of their balloon(s), then try to tag someone on the other team to get that player?s balloon(s).

When time is up, the team that has the most of the other team’s balloons wins!

Balloon Tag

A game similar to tag that’s great for outdoor parties!

1. Tie inflated balloons to the wrist or belt loop of all but one player with ribbon.

2. The player without a balloon is “It”.

3. When that player tags another player, he/she gets the player’s balloon and that player becomes “It”.

Fortune Balloons

Slip a fortune into each balloon before blowing them up with air, not helium.  Toss all the balloons into air and have each guest pop a balloon for their fortune.

Guess the number of Balloons

Fill the family car of the birthday child’s room with balloons.  When each guest arrives, have them write down their guess for the number of balloons in the car or room.  The closest guess wins a special prize.

Valentine Balloon Games

Heart Target Game

Cut some large hearts out of red and pink construction paper and scatter them around the room.  Blow up balloons without knotting, and give them to your children to “set off” into the air- seeing if they can land any on a heart target.  If you have more than one child playing, the winner is the child whose balloon lands closest to the target!  For older kids you could number the targets and get them to keep score.

Heart Basketball

Cut a heart shaped frame our of corrugated cardboard, paint if red or pink and iether suspend it from a doorway or prop it up diagonally between a chair and a wall- you might need to improvise! The children then try to bat their balloons through the heart to score a point.

Valentine Balloon Pop

Pour a small amount of Valentine confetti into your balloons before inflating them and tying off.  Give the children a pin and ask them to keep the balloons in the air until your signal, at which point they can start trying to pop them!  You could also put a small piece of paper with a heart drawn on it into one or two balloons- and whoever retrieves those wins a prize.

Balloon Shaving

A fun outdoor games is “Balloon Shaving”.  Lather up balloons with shaving cream or whipped cream.  Pass out plastic knives.  The first person with a ‘Clean” balloon face wins.  After the contest, this activity usually degenerates into a cream-throwing fight, so be prepared.

Hot Balloon Potato

Materials needed

3- 36” latex balloons, Air Filled

Set up- Players start out in a circle. The game “official” tosses the balloons in the air to signal the start of the game.

Rules of Play: Unlimited players. The goal of this game is to keep the balloons off the ground, out of the trees, and away from the house or anything else that could pop them.  Any player who lets a balloon touch the ground and/or pop is out.  The last person left is the winner.

Balloonyball

Materials needed

3- 11”, triple – stuffed and air filled to 8”

2- 16” latex balloons, helium filled

Ribbon and weights

Set up- attach the two helium-filled balloons to weights.  Stretch ribbon between the two helium-inflated balloons to create the “net” and have participants sitting on each side (in chairs or on the ground).  While any balloon can be used for the balloonyball, a double- or triple- stuffed balloon provides more weight and better playability.  Mark off the game boundaries.

Rules of Play- The game “referee” starts the game by hitting the balloonyball touches the floor, walls, or ceiling, the other team receives a point.  Players must remain seated at all times.  If a player changes from a seated position (by standing or falling out of his or her chair), the other team receives a point.  All serving is done by the referee, alternating sides every point.  If a team member breaks the balloonyball, the other team receives 5 points.  The first team to reach 15 points wins the game.

Optional Rules- The game can be played without an out of bounds line at the backcourt.  So, if a team can hit the balloonyball past all of the players on the other team and not hit the floor, wall, ceiling, they score a point.

 

Fun Balloon Facts

 

If the sound of a balloon popping startles you, you’re not alone. A bursting balloon actually creates a small sonic boom! Once a hole is made in an inflated balloon, the quick release of the balloon’s energy, or air, causes the hole to grow at almost the speed of sound in rubber. Since this speed is much higher than the speed of sound in air, the hole in the balloon actually breaks the sound barrier, creating a sonic boom.

 

Balloons were invented in 1824, the same year as the electromagnet.

 

Pioneer manufactures nearly one billion Qualatex latex balloons per year.

 

Helium-filled balloons float because helium is lighter than nitrogen and oxygen, the two components of air.

 

For more than 80 years, Qualatex balloons have celebrated big events worldwide — from American political conventions to Korean television specials.

 

Inflating & Tying  a Balloon

For ease in tying a balloon, hold 1 inch of the balloon at the neck while you inflate it, so there’s enough room to tie it. Inflate a 260Q balloon by mouth, or with a Qualatex Balloon Pump. To tie the balloon, hold the neck between your left thumb and middle finger, with the nozzle of the balloon pointing up. With your right thumb and index finger, stretch the neck, and wrap it around the tips of your left index and middle fingers in a clockwise direction. Spread your left fingers, and tuck the nozzle down and through the loop with your right hand. Slide your left fingers out of the loop while holding the nozzle with your right hand.